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Gloria Steinem, CIA Agent. They were "enlightened, liberal, nonpartisan"

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Disgusting piece of shit. Che Guevara poster on her wall while she pimped Brzezinski.
================================================== =

-snip-

CIA agents are tight-lipped, but Steinem spoke openly about her relationship to “The Agency” in the 1950s and ‘60s after a magazine revealed her employment by a CIA front organization, the Independent Research Service.

While popularly pilloried because of her paymaster, Steinem defended the CIA relationship, saying: “In my experience The Agency was completely different from its image; it was liberal, nonviolent and honorable.”

-snip-

Strange as it may seem, Steinem’s personal views and CIA political goals aligned. Her brand of social revolution, promoted by American tax dollars, was meant to counter Soviet-sponsored revolutionary messaging. Public funds were intended to slow the Soviet scourge while showing America’s alternative democratic face.

-snip-

Steinem chose to do an honorable duty. She used her brilliance, networks, access, clarity of thought, communication skills and charm to work for the CIA.

She is celebrated anew for her personal and professional achievements, and she deserves recognition for her unapologetic service. Steinem doesn’t regret her time as a spook, saying, “If I had a choice I would do it again.” (snip)

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/o...025-story.html
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Sunday, July 24, 2016
Why Gloria Steinem's CIA past still matters (Ava and C.I.)
Gloria Steinem installed herself as the leader of the feminist movement in 1970.

Prior to that, she'd spent several years working for the CIA and then became a free lance journalist.



At some point, around 1968 or 1969, she was again working for the CIA.

She was listed as a board member of a CIA cut-out.

The cut-outs had been exposed by Congress at one point.

They were 'foundations' that existed solely to funnel CIA money in secret.

As Gloria -- and her media friends (some former CIA like Gloria herself) -- made her into the voice of feminism, she repeatedly watered down and weakened feminism.

Which is why Betty Friedan (the so-called mother of us all and of second wave feminism) publicly floated the charges about her CIA past and others suggested that she clarify when she left the CIA and whether or not she was a government tool who was being paid to destroy feminism?

Gloria knew not to tangle with Betty Friedan.

Friedan was more established than Gloria and had more supporters than Gloria in the press.

So she just ignored those remarks.

But the Restockings had started asking the questions.

And they demanded answers.

When they had a contract to publish an anthology with Random House, Gloria did what a sneaky CIA agent would do, she rounded up friends to threaten to sue.


The chapter was dropped.

Nancy Borman (VILLAGE VOICE) investigated the entire issue in 1976 and found that Gloria Steinem and her friends had no basis for crying "libel."

And, as Borman noted, the CIA issue had already been discussed by Gloria in the press:
In 1967 both the New York Times and the Washington Post carried interviews with Steinem in the wake of Ramparts' expose of CIA funding of the National Student Association and other organizations. Steinem was the founder and director of one of those groups, Independent Research Service, for which she had solicited and obtained CIA money to carry out covert operations at Communist youth festivals in Vienna and Helsinki in 1959 and 1952. Unlike most of the other principals in the scandal, who had repudiated their past work with the agency and turned over information to the press, Steinem defended her secret deal with the CIA, calling the undermining of the youth festivals "the CIA's finest hour."

All these years later, decades, Gloria still can't get honest.

The internet has only made the realities harder for her to run from. (Here's a 1975 PACIFICA RADIO interview with Redstocking Kathie Sarachild discussing Gloria and her CIA connections.)


Gloria Steinem was dishonest.

She was dishonest when she went to youth festivals to subvert them.

She was dishonest when she was confronted about this after she joined the feminist movement.


That's why her past still matters.

She might not have continued working for the CIA.

But she continued being dishonest.

Feminism was making huge strides before Gloria Steinem.

After she's crowned 'leader' by the media and takes up all the space, feminism is nothing but tiny steps.

And that's because of her.

See Veronica Geng's "Requiem for the women's movement," the November 1976 cover story of Harper's. And for a take on 1972 that paints Gloria as a sell-out to women, see Germaine Greer's "McGovern, the big tease" from the October 1972 issue of Harper's.

Is she capable of being honest?

Is she still lying for her own means?

Who knows?


But she's been a lousy self-appointed leader.

As Ellen Willis once wrote of Gloria, "A reformer can never lead a revolution."

Which is probably why -- intentionally or not -- Gloria's circumvented the movement repeatedly.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.

http://thirdestatesundayreview.blogs...ast-still.html

=====================================

INSIDE THE CIA WITH
GLORIA STEINEM

by Nancy Borman reprinted from the Village Voice

At Random House on March 15, 1976, Feminist Revolution was just another
women's book in production. It consisted of a multifaceted analysis of the
women's liberation movement edited by members of Redstockings, an early
radical feminist group. A self-published edition released the previous fall
had stirred up controversy with its indictment of liberals, lesbian pseudo-
leftists, and foundation grant feminists. 5000 copies had sold out.

Part of the book-some say the most interesting part-was titled "Agents,
Opportunists and Fools." It attempted to link the CIA and the corporate
establishment to several individuals and institutions connected with Ms.
Magazine, hardly frightening material for the publishers, through a
subsidiary, Knopf, of The CIA and the Intelligence. Feminist Revolution had
passed an initial libel reading by Random House's legal department on March
2nd, and a contract was signed in the office that March morning. 20,000 copies
of the book were scheduled to hit the stores in June.

That afternoon, an unannounced visitor appeared in the citadel of the free
press. A presumably angry Gloria Steinem asked to see Random House president
Robert Bernstein. She was there to hand-deliver a letter from her attorney
threatening to sue for libel unless the chapter on the CIA was removed from
the book.

-snip-

On March 21st, of this year, 6 weeks after Feminist Revolution was finally
published, 5 members of Redstockings held a press conference to argue that
their book would be better described as "censored." Katie Sarachild, Colette
Price, Carol Hanisch, Sherry Lipsky, and Jane Barry said that at first they
had been astonished that Random House caved into pressure to ax the chapter.

But they also laid the blame on Steinem and her associates for using "libel"
claims to stifle debate within the women's movement and to suppress
embarrassing information about themselves. Price pointed out that the Zenger
trial, which launched the American tradition of freedom of the press, was a
libel case.

The near-total blackout on the Steinem/Random House censorship story is
reminiscent of the level of enthusiasm Redstockings encountered when they
first tried to get coverage for the story of Steinem and the CIA.

Their 16-page tabloid "press release" charging that Steinem had covered up a
10-year association with the CIA and that Ms. magazine, which she had founded,
was endangering the women's liberation movement struck the 1975 MORE
conference like a new war coming over the wire. The hotel was abuzz and people
snatched up the releases, but when it came to actually writing the story,
nearly everyone bowed out (-snip-)

-snip-


In 1967 both the New York Times and the Washington Post carried interviews
with Steinem in the wake of Ramparts' expose of CIA funding of the National
Student Association and other organizations. Steinem was the founder and
director of one of those groups, Independent Research Service, for which she
had solicited and obtained CIA money to carry out covert operations at
Communist youth festivals in Vienna and Helsinki in 1959 and 1952. Unlike most
of the other principals in the scandal, who had repudiated their past work
with the agency and turned over information to the press, Steinem defended her
secret deal with the CIA, calling the undermining of the youth festivals "the
CIA's finest hour."

-snip-

What about the charge made by some quarters of the women's movement that this
whole Steinem/CIA thing is too personal, that Redstocking is picking on
Steinem, perhaps jealous of her?

"You know," says Sarachild, "sometimes a single individual comes to represent
so much of what is wrong-and also has undue power to misinfluence things
because of their connections in the power structure." She points out that
Steinem's Women's Action Alliance not only gets help from the Carnegie
Foundation, but has also received support from Mobil Oil, and the Rockefeller
and Ford Foundations.

I tried to reach Gloria Steinem to get her side of all this, but she was in
meetings, out of the office, out to lunch, on her way to Washington, out
making ad presentations, and on the other phone whenever I called. Steinem
would not return my calls and limited herself to written statements to the
Voice editors.

-snip-

It is noteworthy that at the first American Writer's Congress at the end of
1981, ex-CIA operative Gloria Steinem was prominent on the dias; that all
present nodded affirmatively at her threats of libel suits against those who'd
questioned the propriety of a leading feminist spokesperson having so
notorious and open a CIA background; and that not a single writer present rose
to speak up for the Redstockings point-of-view.

It was as if the very possibility of a critical alternative on the Left had
been erased, obliterated by four years of Carter. First by enlisting the
Left's acquiescence during the '76 campaign, then by offering clemency and
indicting a few token FBI agents, Carter's centrist strategy concluded
startling political penetration of the Left which split WUO, Prairie Fire,
their entire following. The majority were induced to 'lay down their arms,' to
refrain from 'counterproductive' agitation in hope of future reforms by a
visibly unsympathetic administration. Significantly, before 1977 was out, 5
members of the "R.C." (anti-'Inversion') faction of Prairie Fire/WUO
(including Clayton Von Lydegraf and cadres in in Houston and L.A., were
arrested during the government-sponsored Houston International Women's
Conference for plotting to blow up the house of L.A. State Sen. Briggs,
sponsor of the Calif. anti-gay initiative.

http://www.mail-archive.com/ctrl@lis.../msg02217.html

For anyone really interested, here's a link to RedStocking's short statement

"Steinem's career is a template that's been applied on a smaller scale over and over for coopting radical movements. (tweet)

Actvism grounded in mastery of analysis and organization vs activism grounded in celebrity adulation and self-esteem / empowerment rhetoric. (tweet)

CIA snitching / contra propaganda / love of fascist men / weaponized victimhood / movement splitting /radical spectacle for mainstream media (tweet)

How many contemporary "leftists" could this checklist apply to? (tweet)

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