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  1. #1
    Techie Admin Vanessa's Avatar
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    Theresa May to create new internet that would be controlled and regulated by government

    THIS did not get ditched in the Queen's Speech today. It's still on the table.

    Theresa May to create new internet that would be controlled and regulated by government
    ((VIDEO))
    Theresa May to shut down the internet as we know it
    The proposals come soon after the government won the right to collect everyone's browsing history

    @_andrew_griffin
    Friday 19 May 2017 07:43 BST

    Theresa May is planning to introduce huge regulations on the way the internet works, allowing the government to decide what is said online.

    Particular focus has been drawn to the end of the manifesto, which makes clear that the Tories want to introduce huge changes to the way the internet works.

    "Some people say that it is not for government to regulate when it comes to technology and the internet," it states. "We disagree."

    Senior Tories confirmed to BuzzFeed News that the phrasing indicates that the government intends to introduce huge restrictions on what people can post, share and publish online.
    The plans will allow Britain to become "the global leader in the regulation of the use of personal data and the internet", the manifesto claims.
    It comes just soon after the Investigatory Powers Act came into law. That legislation allowed the government to force internet companies to keep records on their customers' browsing histories, as well as giving ministers the power to break apps like WhatsApp so that messages can be read.

    The manifesto makes reference to those increased powers, saying that the government will work even harder to ensure there is no "safe space for terrorists to be able to communicate online". That is apparently a reference in part to its work to encourage technology companies to build backdoors into their encrypted messaging services – which gives the government the ability to read terrorists' messages, but also weakens the security of everyone else's messages, technology companies have warned.

    -snip-

    The manifesto even suggests that the government might stop search engines like Google from directing people to pornographic websites. "We will put a responsibility on industry not to direct users – even unintentionally – to hate speech, pornography, or other sources of harm," the Conservatives write.

    -snip-

    The Conservatives will also seek to regulate the kind of news that is posted online and how companies are paid for it. If elected, Theresa May will "take steps to protect the reliability and objectivity of information that is essential to our democracy" – and crack down on Facebook and Google to ensure that news companies get enough advertising money.

    -snip-

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...-a7744176.html
    You can easily get agreement between a pig and a cow that wolves are bad, but they can easily fall into the trap where the pig says
    wolves should eat more beef, while the cow recommends a diet of pork.

  2. #2
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    How?

  3. #3
    Techie Admin Vanessa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Downwinder View Post
    How?
    Global treaties it seems.

    -snip-

    In response, May wants “allied, democratic governments to reach international agreements to regulate cyberspace in an effort to prevent the spread of extremism and terrorist planning”. This comes on top of an election manifesto promise to make the U.K. a “global leader” in regulating the web.

    May already introduced one of the toughest regulatory regimes in the world in 2016 through the Investigatory Powers Act. Dubbed the "Snooper's Charter" by opponents, civil libertarians have blasted the act as totalitarian because it gives authorities the right to intercept, record and monitor Internet use. Now, she suggests, she wants to go further with a global treaty of sorts.

    -snip-

    But the U.S. will need to be involved too, of course. May had hoped a treaty to get U.S.-based Internet service providers (ISPs) like AT&T, Comcast, and Time Warner to share information on possible extremist activity with British authorities would be passed before the presidential election last year, but is still waiting.

    A source on the powerful Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament tells TIME this is necessary for the U.K.’s security — but warns that international treaties won't necessarily mean better access to servers. “Even if every Western country in the world ganged up together there is still the risk the ISP could move servers to somewhere not covered under that agreement, like China.”

    ISPs have been accused of not doing enough to monitor and share information from their sites. Alan West, a former Labour Party counter-terrorism minister and ex-head of the U.K. Navy, says: “More can be done and more should be done. Big ISPs have been economical in the actuality of what they can do."

    West notes that the U.K. piled pressure on ISPs over monitoring for child pornography, and their response was "amazing." He suggests treating ISPs like print publishers, meaning they could be liable for what appears on their sites and therefore face multi-million dollar lawsuits. “Goodness knows they’d change their behavior then,” he adds.

    Social media companies are a different matter. May’s government has been pushing for “backdoors” on end-to-end encryption services, such as WhatsApp, so that authorities can infiltrate secret conversations. Apple chief executive Tim Cook said introducing such a legal obligation would have “very dire consequences”, because these backdoors would also be available to terrorists, who could then hack encrypted intelligence conversations.However, cyber security expert Andrew Henderson of Wychwood Consulting says there are already methods of cracking encrypted messages. “If you encrypt something there’s always a key,” he says. “If you can get hold of the key and the encrypted message then you don't need a backdoor, you can go through the front door.”

    -snip-

    http://time.com/4805645/theresa-may-...tack-internet/
    You can easily get agreement between a pig and a cow that wolves are bad, but they can easily fall into the trap where the pig says
    wolves should eat more beef, while the cow recommends a diet of pork.

  4. #4
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    They can Brexit. Prevent Brits from international access and prevent international access to British sites. Neither will be acceplable to neocons interested in commerce. I think that like other May dreams this is a pipe dream. Going to limit UK newspapers to UK residents?

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